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diet supplements

Coupled with a good hormone-friendly diet, supplements can further naturally balance and control hormone levels. The following are examples of beneficial supplements for hormonal balance…
Fish Oil (containing EPA and DHA) – vital for production of healthy prostaglandins and anti-inflammatory substances in the body.
B Vitamins, taken as a “complex” – B vitamins together with EPA and DHA are paramount for healthy oestrogen/progesterone balance, AND liver function.


Antioxidants such as green tea extract, d-limonene, turmeric or other quality antioxidants to support healthy cellular ageing.

Do supplements help?

Other oestrogen-supporting agents – isoflavones, non-soy isoflavones, phytonutrients, active folates (supporting methylation), support female health at all stages as well as benefiting breast health, bone health and cardiovascular health.

Calcium together with other essential nutrients to support bone health – calcium must be in an absorbable form, and taken with other nutrients, such as magnesium, vitamin D and boron. Microcrystalline “hydroxyapatite” (MCHC) is the ultimate form of calcium for proper absorption into bone, and studies show this to be effective in improving bone density in postmenopausal women.
N.B. Always seek advice from a registered Nutritionist before embarking on a specific supplement programme.

Do Supplements Help Achieve Weight Loss

diet supplements

diet supplements


Balancing herbs can be very helpful for many women in dealing with stress or sex hormone imbalance (particularly during the pre-menstrual phase and during and after menopause). Examples include chaste berry (agnus castus), dong quai, black cohosh, red clover, ginger, evening primrose, peony root, red raspberry leaf, and St. John’s Wort.
Many can be taken in isolation, or in combination with each other.
Always get professional advise before taking herbs, especially if you are on ANY medication, or hormonal treatment.

Latest Update: Thursday, December 13, 2018

Not All Carbs Are Bad! Learn the Difference Between Good and Bad Carbs


No carbohydrates are good or bad. No food is truly bad or good. Carbohydrates and food items simply cause different things to happen in your body when you eat them. It is better to think of carbohydrates as whether you should eat them or avoid them, as opposed to them being bad or good. Carbohydrates could get their feelings hurt if they heard you referring to them as bad, or evil.


That having been said, there are distinct differences between certain types of carbohydrates. You understand that not all fruits look and taste the same. The same is true with vegetables. There are any number of variations of pizzas. So there are definitely different types of carbs. Let’s take a look at the construction of carbohydrates, because that really is what makes carbs either healthy or unhealthy for your body.

The Difference Between Simple and Complex Carbohydrates

not all carbs are badWhen a food has a very simple molecular construction, it is broken down very quickly. In the case of simple carbohydrates, they enter your bloodstream almost instantly. This is not a good thing. When the carbohydrates you eat are complex, they are hard for your body to break down. Imagine a simple puzzle or brainteaser as opposed to the New York Times crossword puzzle.
Solving a simple puzzle doesn’t do much, if anything, for your brainpower. Solving the New York Times crossword puzzle gives you an incredibly healthy brain boost. The same difference applies to simple and complex carbohydrates.
Carbohydrates are sugars. They come in a couple of forms, simple and complex. You may hear simple carbohydrates referred to as simple sugars or simple starches as well. Simple carbohydrates, as mentioned above, enter your bloodstream rapidly. They raise your blood glucose levels quickly. Unfortunately, the sugar in these “bad” carbs is rapidly converted and stored as fat, to be used as an energy source later.
Complex carbohydrates are very difficult to break down. Their construction is intricate, so they are hard to take apart. They are usually much higher in dietary fiber than simple carbs, and any glucose in these carbohydrates is efficiently processed before it goes straight into your bloodstream.
Simple carbohydrates include soft drinks, candy, artificial syrups, table sugar, pastries and desserts, white rice, white pasta and white bread. Complex carbs, “good” carbs, are found in beans, legumes, nuts, whole grains, fruits and vegetables. If you just do what mama told you when you were a kid (Eat your fruits and vegetables!), you will avoid most simple carbohydrates, enjoy lots of complex carbohydrates, and treat your brain and body to better health and wellness.

Not All Carbs Are Bad

Latest Update: Thursday, December 13, 2018


Women’s health (physical and mental) is closely related (and somewhat “mimics”) hormonal status and “balance” in the body.
Hormonal status here refers to the interplay between female sex hormones (oestrogen and progesterone), stress hormones (specifically cortisol), and thyroid hormones (TSH, T4, T3). Sex hormone production and balance is particularly sensitive to levels of stress hormones.
Stress has a profound effect on oestrogen/progesterone balance, as well as creating unnecessary inflammation in the body.


A hormonal cycle in perfect balance helps a woman to feel confident, empowered, healthy and happy. A woman who feels “out of sorts”, is depressed for no apparent reason, or shows other common signs and symptoms of hormonal imbalance (of which there are many), is either under too much stress, not taking enough exercise, and or, is eating a poor diet. She herself is out of balance!
Eating poorly results in the body not getting sufficient nutrients necessary to produce enough of the correct hormones in the correct balance.
Nutrients often lacking include essential fatty acids (especially GLA, EPA and DHA), B vitamins (especially B6), calcium and magnesium.

Healthy Diet For Women

Healthy Diet
A “healthy diet for a healthy woman” should be “designed” to encourage normal healthy production, balance, detoxification and excretion of oestrogen and other hormones. The organs involved are the ovaries and adrenals (for production), the liver (for detoxification), and the kidneys and bowel (for excretion via faeces and urine). Naturally, these organs need to be in good working order, and nourished correctly!
The diet should contain a vast array of antioxidants and anti-inflammatory agents to dampen any internal inflammation. It should aim to lower insulin levels (minimising fat storage), and improve insulin sensitivity, i.e. the way in which the body handles sugars. This helps to burn fat, as well as minimising excess fat being converted to oestrogen.

(N.B. Fat cells can convert fat to a “bad” oestrogen via a biochemical process called aromatisation).

Soya protein seems to encourage fat loss in the body together with an improvement in the amount of lean muscle tissue. Soya (especially soy concentrates) contains high levels of beneficial plant oestrogens… known as isoflavones. Isoflavones help to re-balance levels of good and bad oestrogens, and promote a healthier oestrogen/progesterone balance. Non-soya food sources of isoflavones include fennel, flaxseeds (ground or milled otherwise they are largely indigestible), fenugreek, cumin and other spices, blueberries, and the herbs red clover, black cohosh and kudzu. Ground flaxseeds incidentally are a great “soluble” fibre source that promotes the excretion of oestrogen via faeces, and also minimises oestrogens being re-absorbed back into the body.

Green tea “catechins” also contribute to healthy oestrogen detoxification and excretion.
A diet that is rich in cruciferous vegetables and wholegrains supports healthy liver function…. specifically in the healthy detoxification of oestrogen and other hormones through the liver.
Latest Update: Thursday, December 13, 2018